Framing and Goals

A key focus of the January White House College Opportunity event was the importance of helping more low-income and disadvantaged youth succeed in critical science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. A wide range of foundations, non-profits, and college and university presidents, responded to the President’s call by announcing new steps to boost STEM achievement and broaden participation in STEM fields. To build on this momentum, the White House is planning a series of events this fall to bring together those who made commitments around STEM at the January summit and to grow the coalition of participants.

The workshop will provide a venue for participants to give updates on the progress their institution has made and to share and come away with new ideas and tools for what more they can accomplish at their institutions to improve STEM outcomes for more students. The President has renewed his call to action on College Opportunity and the White House has announced that the President and First Lady will host the next Summit on College Opportunity on December 4, 2014.

 

   Meeting Details

When: October 1, 2014 - 9:00AM
Where: GC Ballrooms -or- Via Live Webcast
Who: Approximately 100 thought leaders
Confirmed keynote speakers, panelists, and session leads: John Holdren, Mark B. Rosenberg, Susan Singer, Ann Beheler, Eric Brewe, Cristian Carranza, Laird Kramer, Eduardo J. Padrón, Colin Potts, Rebecca Richards-Kortum.

 

John Holdren, Assistant to the President for Science and Technology, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and Co-Chair of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST)

HoldrenDr. John P. Holdren is Assistant to the President for Science and Technology, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and Co-Chair of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST). Prior to joining the Obama administration Dr. Holdren was Teresa and John Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy and Director of the Program on Science, Technology, and Public Policy at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, as well as professor in Harvard's Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and Director of the independent, nonprofit Woods Hole Research Center. Previously he was on the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley, where he co-founded in 1973 and co-led until 1996 the interdisciplinary graduate-degree program in energy and resources. During the Clinton administration Dr. Holdren served as a member of PCAST through both terms and in that capacity chaired studies requested by President Clinton on preventing theft of nuclear materials, disposition of surplus weapon plutonium, the prospects of fusion energy, U.S. energy R&D strategy, and international cooperation on energy-technology innovation.

Dr. Holdren holds advanced degrees in aerospace engineering and theoretical plasma physics from MIT and Stanford. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, as well as a foreign member of the Royal Society of London and former president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He served as a member of the MacArthur Foundation’s Board of Trustees from 1991 to 2005, as Chair of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on International Security and Arms Control from 1994 to 2005, and as Co-Chair of the independent, bipartisan National Commission on Energy Policy from 2002 to 2009. His awards include a MacArthur Foundation Prize Fellowship, the John Heinz Prize in Public Policy, the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement, and the Volvo Environment Prize. In December 1995 he gave the acceptance lecture for the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs, an international organization of scientists and public figures in which he held leadership positions from 1982 to 1997.

 

Mark B. Rosenberg, President of Florida International University.

singerMark B. Rosenberg is president of Florida International University. A public institution of higher education, FIU is the face of the country's future in higher education demographics: it is a majority-minority institution that leads the country in the production of minority degrees in the sciences and engineering Dr. Rosenberg has served as the fifth president of FIU since August 2009. A political scientist specializing in Latin America, Dr. Rosenberg is the first FIU faculty member to ascend to the university's presidency. He is a first-generation college graduate whose two children are graduates of FIU.

Under his leadership as president, FIU has increased enrollment to almost 54,000 students, improved graduation rates by nearly 10% and hired over 500 new faculty. As President, Dr. Rosenberg has provided leadership to grow the institution's budget, improve student graduation and retention rates, expand internships for enrolled students, and coordinate FIU's emergence as a leading producer of graduates in priority national and state areas focused on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). The university has been named as a Carnegie Engaged institution, and has developed path-breaking partnerships with the Miami Dade County Public Schools, JP Morgan Chase, Florida Power & Light and Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. Research expenditures have grown by nearly 30% to nearly $125 million, and over sixty new student advisers and counselors have been hired for a restructured and expanded student graduation initiative.

From 2005 to 2008, Dr. Rosenberg served as the Founding Chancellor for the Board of Governors of the State University System of Florida, which includes all of Florida's public universities - over 325,000 students and an all-accounts budget of nearly $9 billion. As chancellor, Dr. Rosenberg led the system's strategic development and financial planning and policy initiatives, working closely with Gov. Jeb Bush and Gov. Charlie Crist and the state legislature to secure support for SUS priorities. During this era, major new strides were made in research support for the system, over $1 billion was provided for new facility construction, and a new SUS strategic plan was developed and approved.

Prior to becoming chancellor, Dr. Rosenberg was integrally involved in the expansion and development of FIU into a major public research university. As Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs from 1998 to 2005, Dr. Rosenberg spearheaded the establishment of a law school in 2002 and a medical school in 2006. Under his leadership, FIU increased enrollment, implemented major campus construction projects, and was invited to join the select national honor society Phi Beta Kappa. Dr. Rosenberg was also instrumental in moving FIU into the top tier of Carnegie Foundation research universities. Dr. Rosenberg's academic career began at FIU in 1976 as an assistant professor of political science. In 1979, he founded the FIU Latin American and Caribbean Center, which today is one of the nation's premier federally-supported research and teaching centers focusing on the region.

 

Susan Singer, Division Director, Division Undergraduate Education, National Science Foundation

singerSusan Rundell Singer, Division Director for Undergraduate Education at the National Science Foundation and the Laurence McKinley Gould Professor, in the Biology and Cognitive Science Departments at Carleton College. She pursues a career that integrates science and education. In addition to a PhD in biology from Rensselaer, she completed a teacher certification program in New York State. s. Her biological research focuses on the evolution, genetics, and development of flowering in legumes with an interest in prairie legumes as a biofuel source. She co-authors an introductory biology text and is actively engaged in efforts to improve undergraduate science education. Her National Academies committee service has included contributions to the Committee on Undergraduate Science Education, the committee that authored America’s Lab Report (chair), the committee that authored Taking Science to School (science consultant), a committee on agriculture education, and the committee on Promising Practices in STEM Undergraduate Education (chair).

 

Ann Beheler, Principal Investigator, National Convergence Technology Center; Executive Director of Emerging Technology Grants, Collin County Community College (invited)

singerAnn Beheler has been in the Information Technology industry for over 30 years, and she is now responsible for Emerging Technology grants at Collin College. In that capacity she leads the National Information, Security, and Geospatial Technologies Consortium, an almost $20 million DOL TAACCCT grant and the National Convergence Technology Center, a $4.4 million National Science Foundation grant. Ann has corporate experience, has led her own consulting firm, has created and taught in one of the first networking degree programs in Texas, and has previously managed IT-related divisions and grants ranging $1-$20 million in community colleges in Texas and California. Prior to her current position, she was Vice President of Academic Affairs for Porterville College, responsible for all instruction at the college, and prior that she was a Dean at both Orange Coast College in California and at Collin College.

 

Eric Brewe, Assistant Professor Science Education, Florida International University

singerEric Brewe is a Physics Education Researcher (PER) whose research is centered on Modeling Instruction. Modeling Instruction is a curriculum and pedagogy founded on the idea that science learning involves creation, use, validation, and revision of conceptual models. These conceptual models are built of coordinated representations and form the basis for classroom interactions. These conceptual models are hypothesized to be appropriated into students’ own mental models. Research on Modeling Instruction has included investigations of the efficacy of Modeling in student understanding, attitudes, and as an inclusive pedagogy. Extending the research to include studies of student interactions both in and outside of the class has led to the novel use of Network Analysis in PER. Findings from network analyses have linked student engagement in the classroom and outside to positive outcomes. Ongoing projects include networked studies of persistence and retention, investigations of the process of appropriation of conceptual models into mental models, and extensions of the Modeling Instruction approach. Dr. Brewe also serves as co-editor for Effective Practices in Physics Teacher Preparation, and an upcoming special issue of Physical Review ST– Physics Education Research on Gender.

 

Cristian Carranza, Director of STEM, Miami Dade County Public Schools

singerSince 2013, Cristian Carranza has been the Founding Director for the M-DCPS STEM initiative, dedicated to leveraging the expertise and capital of the Department of Career and Technical Education and the Department of Mathematics and Science to increase student achievement in STEM curriculum to enhance career and college readiness. Carranza acts as the M-DCPS district liaison to partnerships and initiatives in the area of STEM: FCR-STEM (FSU), UF STEM Tips, FIU ACCESS STEM initiatives, MDC College STEM Expo, UM P-SELL science curriculum. He established the M-DCPS STEM Mobile Lab initiative and manages the mobile lab support students and teachers receive throughout the school year in elementary and middle schools and coordinates and manages M-DCPS STEM initiatives with community partners. Additionally, he is Principal Investigator of 21st Century Community Learning Center (CCLC) SECME Stars after school program, which serves students and their families from four Title I schools.

 

Laird Kramer, Professor of Physics, Florida International University

singerLaird Kramer is an Associate Professor of Physics at Florida International University, a minority serving public research institution in Miami, FL. In 1996 he joined the faculty as a nuclear experimentalist and has in recent years turned to building a transformational education outreach model. Since 2003, he has led the Education Outreach component of CHEPREO, the Center for High Energy Physics Research and Education Outreach. CHEPREO uses its high-energy physics base as fertile ground for an extensive education and outreach effort based in diverse South Florida. CHEPREO-led efforts have transformed the undergraduate physics experience at FIU, creating more and better prepared majors by empowering students through the implementation modeling instruction-based studio physics courses, establishment of student-centric methodologies, and establishment of a high school/university research and learning community. These reforms have led to a rapidly growing PER group, the awarding of a PhysTEC Primary Partner Institute to FIU in 2007, and a recently awarded Noyce Fellowship program that encompasses mathematics, chemistry, earth sciences, and physics programs. The efforts have also served as basis for recent reforms of the secondary education science and mathematics programs at FIU, led by the PER group.

 

Eduardo J. Padrón, President, Miami Dade College (invited)

singerAn American by choice, Eduardo Padrón arrived in the United States as a refugee at the age of 15. Since 1995, he has served as President of Miami Dade College (MDC), the largest institution of higher education in America with more than 165,000 students. He is credited with elevating MDC into a position of national prominence among the best and most recognized U.S. colleges and universities. An economist by training, Dr. Padrón earned his Ph.D. from the University of Florida. In 2009, TIME magazine included him on the list of “The 10 Best College Presidents.” In 2010, Florida Trend magazine named him “Floridian of the Year.” In 2011, The Washington Post named him one of the eight most influential college presidents in the U.S. Also in 2011, he was awarded the prestigious 2011 Carnegie Corporation Centennial Academic Leadership Award. In 2012, he received the Citizen Service Award from Voices for National Service, the coveted TIAA-CREF Hesburgh Award for Leadership Excellence, and the Aspen Institute Ascend Fellowship. Dr. Padrón’s energetic leadership extends to many of the nation’s leading organizations. He is the immediate past chair of the board of directors of the American Council on Education (ACE) and is a past chair of the board of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). He also serves on the American Academy of Arts & Sciences' Commission on the Humanities & Social Sciences.

 

Colin Potts, Vice President for Undergraduate Education, Georgia Institute of Technology

singerVice Provost for Undergraduate Education Colin Potts oversees offices and programs affecting undergraduate education including the Center for Career Discovery and Development, the Honors Program and Fellowships Office, the Center for Academic Enrichment, and the Center for Academic Success. He sits on the President’s Cabinet and represents Georgia Tech’s undergraduate academic affairs to the University System of Georgia Board of Regents and the Association of American Universities (AAU), among other constituencies. He also evaluates and approves academic policies affecting undergraduate students and proposals for all undergraduate courses and programs. He is best known for design methods that start not from technology innovation but from user needs and envisaged scenarios of use. Potts has been responsible for designing and teaching courses in software engineering, human-computer interaction design and evaluation, and the social and ethical implications of information technology.

 

Rebecca Richards-Kortum, Stanley C. Moore Professor of Bioengineering; Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Founder, Beyond Traditional Borders; Director, Rice 360°: Institute for Global Health Technology, Rice University

singerFor two decades, Rebecca Richards-Kortum has focused on translating research that integrates advances in nanotechnology and molecular imaging with microfabrication technologies to develop optical imaging systems that are inexpensive, portable, and provide point-of-care diagnosis. This basic and translational research is highly collaborative and has led to new technologies to improve the early detection of cancers and other diseases, especially in impoverished settings. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) use micro-scale technology to design low-cost, reusable platforms for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. When used with contrast agents, these rugged and portable optical imaging systems detect molecular signatures of pre-cancer, assess tumor margins, and monitor a patient’s response to therapy. Current systems are being tested and applied through multidisciplinary collaborations with clinicians and researchers at Rice, the UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, UT Health Science Center-Houston, UT at Austin, the University of Arizona, and the British Columbia Cancer Agency. Over the past few years, Richards-Kortum and collaborators have translated these technologies from North America to both low- and medium-resource developing countries (Botswana, India, Taiwan, Mexico, and Brazil).

 

Conference Outcomes

Participants with existing commitments to institutional transformation will be given the opportunity to provide updates on the progress their organization has made in fulfilling their commitments in breakout sessions, discussing challenges and highlighting best practices. Those new to the community will be provided opportunities to establish their commitments to the national movement. In situ capturing of the working sessions will allow for the capture of discussions along all core areas of focus.This will support the dissemination of conference outcomes, through the following means:

  • A public report of the event and summary of talks, and outcomes
  • Internally shared documents to participants
  • Emergent tools and outcomes

 

   Schedule

STEM Education Workshop
White House College Opportunity Initiative
Florida International University
Miami, Florida
October 1, 2014
GC Ballrooms

 

Time Event
9:00AM

Welcome / Introductions:

Kenneth G. Furton, Provost, Florida International University

John P. Holdren, Assistant to the President for Science and Technology

Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and Co-Chair of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST)

Mark B. Rosenberg, President, Florida International

9:45AM

Panel: Innovation in STEM Teaching and Learning

Moderator: Susan Singer, Division Director, Division Undergraduate Education, National Science Foundation

Eric Brewe, Associate Professor Science Education, Florida International University

Cristian Carranza, Director of STEM, Miami Dade County Public Schools

Mel Cossette, Executive Director and Principal Investigator, National Resource Center for Materials Technology Education; Project T.E.A.M. and National Educators Workshop, Edmonds Community College

Veronica Leatuad, Director of Education, Beyond Traditional Borders, Rice University

10:30AM

Break / Networking

10:45AM

Thematic Working Sessions 1

Topic #1: STEM Introductory Course Redesign
Facilitator: Eric Brewe, Assistant Professor Science Education, Florida International University

Topic #2: Freshman/Sophomore Research Initiatives
Facilitator: Veronica Leatuad, Director of Education, Beyond Traditional Borders, Rice University

Topic #3: College Readiness and Pathways into STEM Degrees
Facilitator: Cristian Carranza, Director of STEM, Miami Dade County Public Schools

Topic #4: Connection to STEM Careers
Facilitator: Mel Cossette, Executive Director and Principal Investigator, National Resource Center for Materials Technology Education; Project T.E.A.M. and National Educators Workshop, Edmonds Community College

12:15PM

Gather and Begin Lunch

12:45PM

Remarks: Barriers, Opportunities, and Success

Laird Kramer, Professor of Physics, Florida International University

Colin Potts, Vice President for Undergraduate Education, Georgia Institute of Technology

1:45PM

Break / Networking

2:00PM

Facilitated Working Session

A focus on ideas and tools to come away with for what (or what more) participants can accomplish at their institutions to improve STEM outcomes for more students.

3:30PM

Close Meeting

Optional Tour to Active Learning STEM Classroom and Mastery Math Lab with Students

 

   Travel & Lodging

  • Location

    Florida International University
    11200 SW 8th Street
    Miami, FL 33199
    GC Ballrooms

  • Airport

    FIU's nearest airport is Miami International Airport (MIA)
    http://www.miami-airport.com/

  • Directions to Campus

    FROM MIAMI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
    Take the 1-836-WEST exit from the Airport
    Follow 1-836- to the Florida Turnpike (FTP)
    Take the Florida Turnpike South exit
    Follow the Turnpike to the Tamiami Trail exit (SW 8th Street)
    Take SW 8th Street East exit, follow SW 8th Street
    Make a right on SW 107th Avenue
    Make a right on 16th street
    Stay to the right on the traffic circle until STOP sign is reached
    Turn right at STOP sign, metered parking is located immediately to the left
    The Graham Center is located in front of the metered parking

    FROM 1-95 DOWNTOWN MIAMI, FT. LAUDERDALE & WEST PALM BEACH
    Take 1-95 to 1-836 WEST
    Follow the Florida Turnpike SOUTH exit
    Follow the Florida Turnpike to the Tamiami Trail exit (SW 8th Street)
    Take the SW 8th Street EAST exit
    Follow SW 8th Street
    Make a right on SW 107th Avenue
    Make a right on 16th street
    Stay to the right on the traffic circle until STOP sign is reached
    Turn right at STOP sign, metered parking is located immediately to the left
    The Graham Center is located in front of the metered parking

    FROM PALM BEACH/BROWARD COUNTY/ FLORIDA TURNPIKE –NORTH
    Take the Florida Turnpike SOUTH
    Follow the Florida Turnpike to the Tamiami Trail exit (SW 8th Street)
    Follow SW 8th Street
    Make a right on SW 107th Avenue
    Make a right on 16th street
    Stay to the right on the traffic circle until STOP sign is reached
    Turn right at STOP sign, metered parking is located immediately to the left
    The Graham Center is located in front of the metered parking

  • Campus Maps & Parking Locations

    http://campusmaps.fiu.edu/
    http://campusmaps.fiu.edu/mmc-map.pdf

  • Hotels Near FIU

    Comfort Suites
    http://www.comfortsuitesmiami.com/
    3901 SW 117 Ave
    Miami, FL 33175
    305-220-3901
    Price = $
    Distance: 5 min from campus – no traffic

    Courtyard Marriott (Dolphin)
    http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/miadm-courtyard-miami-at-dolphin-mall/
    11275 Northwest 12th Street
    Miami, FL 33172
    305-994-9343
    Price = $$
    Distance: 10 min from campus – no traffic

    Sofitel Hotel
    http://www.sofitel.com/gb/hotel-0889-sofitel-miami/index.shtml
    5800 Blue Lagoon Dr
    Miami, FL 33126
    305-264-4888
    Price = $$$
    Distance: 15 min from campus – no traffic

    Westin Colonnade
    http://www.westincoralgables.com/
    180 Aragon Avenue
    Coral Gables, FL 33134
    (305) 441-2600
    Price = $$$
    Distance: 20 min from campus – no traffic

    Biltmore
    http://www.biltmorehotel.com/
    1200 Anastasia Ave
    Coral Gables, FL 33134
    305-445-1926
    Price = $$$$
    Distance: 20 min from campus – no traffic

 

   Attendees

We anticipate participation from a large number of colleges and universities, foundations and philanthropic organizations, private industry, and others from the January commitment cohort and the extended community. A primary target audience is leaders from individual institutions of higher education that span the range of institutions positioned to address participation in STEM education, and we begin by drawing from those who participated in the College Opportunity event.

Beyond individual institutions we will include those coalitions and organizations focusing on this agenda including but not limited to: the AAU (STEM Education Initiative), APLU (SMTI, MTEP, and their national network initiatives), Project Kaleidoscope, and the Bay View Alliance. Federal agencies committed to this initiative will be included (for example the National Research Council, National Science Foundation, NASA, US Department of Education). Similarly we will include regional organizations from the state initiatives in STEM education to regional accreditors (NCA / HLC) and organizations of universities (WICHE).

 

   Resources

Federal Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education Strategic Plan
Earlier this year, the Committee on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Education (CoSTEM) completed the development of a 5-year strategic Federal STEM education plan, as called for by the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010.
http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/stem_stratplan_2013.pdf

Engage to Excel: Producing One Million Additional College Graduates with Degrees in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics.
In 2012, the President’s Council of Advisers on Science and Technology released this report which provides a strategy for improving STEM education during the first two years of college.
http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/pcast-engage-to-excel-final_2-25-12.pdf

logo
Visit FIU's STEM website at http://stem.fiu.edu/

Live Webcast of Event
http://webcast.fiu.edu/

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